Carla Gannis: Garden of Emoji Delights

 

October 17th – November 15th, 2014
Reception for the artist: Friday, October 24th, 6-8PM
The event is free and open to the public.


Chicago, IL - Kasia Kay Art Projects is proud to announce the opening of Carla Gannis’s third solo exhibition with the gallery entitled: Garden of Emoji Delights.

Carla Gannis’s work examines the narrativity of 21st century representational technologies and questions the hybrid nature of identity, where virtual and real embodiments of self diverge and intersect.

The exhibition is an installation of a large scale triptych, which comprises digitally collaged emoji symbols and animated characters into Hieronymus Bosch’s painting The Garden of Earthly Delights, (1500-1505), along with a small 3-D printed sculpture entitled "Escape Pod", a collaboration between Gannis and Everett Kane that explores the theatrical poetries of the modern domicile. The exhibition will also include one-of-a-kind digital drawings by Gannis. 

In The Garden of Emoji Delights, Carla Gannis contextualizes Emoji within the iconographic lineage of the works of Hieronymus Bosch, re-inscribing the third panel of his triptych, The Garden of Earthly Delights, by using the new secular, pop vocabulary of signs and digital symbols.

These symbols are as pervasive now as religious symbology was in the 15th and 16th centuries. According to Carla Gannis, Emoji add a new flatness to the iconography of the past, emptying it of controversy and replacing it with something akin to Murakami’s Superflat aesthetic questioning the “sins” of our contemporary consumer culture.

In an essay accompanying The Garden of Emoji Delights titled ‘Digicalyptic Realities, or The Frolic of the Flat’, curator Sabin Bors claims that this is arguably one of the most relevant digital works in recent years. While discussing digital symbology in its relation to Bosch’s Garden of Earthly Delights, the relation between Emoji Delights and the works of other contemporary artists influenced by Bosch, or the place of Emoji Delights in the work of Carla Gannis, the author makes an interesting interpretation on the role of the digital in contemporary society and the passage from culture to civilization.

For all its technological infrastructure, the digitalization of communication is seen as a means to disseminate an increasingly analogical content that bears more emotional charge and agency. Sabin Bors argues, however, that to understand The Garden of Emoji Delights, we must understand the type of culture these images and their power belong to, the technological codifications of today’s language, and the relation between expressions and consumer culture.

Carla Gannis lives and works in Brooklyn, New York. She has exhibited in solo and group exhibitions both nationally and internationally. Gannis is the recipient of several awards and her work has been featured or reviewed in The Huffington Post, Wired, Art F City, Hyperallergic, The Wallstreet Journal, & The New York Times, among others. Most recently she collaborated with poet Justin Petropoulos on a transmedia book, installation and net art project entitled <legend> </legend> (Jaded Ibis Press and Transfer Gallery, 2013). She is faculty and Assistant Chair of the Department of Digital Arts at Pratt Institute. Carla Gannis is represented by Kasia Kay Art projects Gallery in Chicago and by Transfer Gallery in New York.

 

Acknowledgements: Rafia Olufemi Santana, Studio Assistant

Please contact the gallery for more information and images.

 


 

May 30, 2014

Kasia Kay Art Projects is pleased to announce that the Gallery’s artist, David A. Parker is appearing in Street Road Artists Space's ‘Arterial Motives’ group exhibition.


Street Road Artists Space: Arterial Motives 

May 31 - October 31 

Opening Reception: May 31st, 1PM - 5PM

"Street Road Artists Space presents Arterial Motives, an exhibition of artworks from four continents, all of which highlight a fundamental issue of contemporary life in our increasingly car-centric world: automotive traffic." - Learn more from the site http://www.streetroad.org/arterial-motives.html

"Enskyment" features a cast of the artist's head made from seeds.  A motion-triggered camera takes photos of birds that stop by for a meal.  The goal is to capture the process of the form being taken into the sky.    

Where do "we" end, and "the world" begins? We are all carbon-based life forms... the materials of our body have been around for millions of years - they just assembled into the form of this body for a while... later they will take other forms.  Since that will happen, why not enjoy the thought that we could be carried into the sky by the birds?  In the words of poet Robinson Jeffers: 

"What a sublime end of one's body, what an enskyment; what a life after death." [Source: http://www.poemhunter.com/best-poems/robinson-jeffers/vulture/ ] 

- David A. Parker